Procedure Day: August 13, 2015

We took a hiatus from our typical grand rounds on August 13 to do hands-on learning in 4 different stations:

CMAC Intubation
1. We had our inservice with the CMAC intubation device, a glidescope-like device that is shaped like a Macintosh blade. The idea with this device is that it allows the intubating physician to essentially practice with a Mac blade while allowing onlookers to see where the tip of the blade is. Also, there is a chip in the device that allows recording of the intubation to enhance debriefing and troubleshooting after the procedure is done. These devices will be rolling out in the areas in the next few weeks, thanks to the hard work of the admin division.

aScope Nasotracheal Intubation
2. Our department recently acquired aScopes, which are disposable fiberoptic-like scopes designed to assist with nasotracheal intubation. These will ultimately allow us to perform difficult intubations without the assistance of ENT. The protocol for its use is still being worked out, but we had a hoot numbing up Ramin and Neil and having a look on each other.

3. We cycled through three simulation stations as well, giving us a hand at neonatal, pediatric, and adult cases. Special thanks to the neonatal attending Dr. Biniwale for bringing his team down to practice with us!
Neonatal Simulation

4. Drs. Rose, Kearl, and Santillanes refreshed our memories with tips and tricks for placing intraosseous lines, umbilical lines, and performing needle cricothyrotomies. A couple important points included that you can only attempt one IO per bone, the umbilical line is a good option up to 7 (or maybe 10?) days of life, and that a needle cric is a temporizing procedure at best.

Thanks to all the faculty for dedicating the time for these sessions! Now get out there and practice this stuff!!

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